LEGAL DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is not legal advice and does not constitute any agreement by Bordeau Immigration Law, LLC to provide legal representation to any individual. This information is only intended to provide general information about common immigration matters and does not present an exhaustive discussion of immigration law. Immigration law and procedures change frequently and some information on this website may not be current. No individual should rely on information contained herein for his or her particular case and should consult with a qualified immigration attorney regarding specific questions about immigration status and eligibility.

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Naturalization

A permanent resident is eligible for US citizenship 5 years after becoming a permanent resident, unless the individual is married to a US citizen, in which case the individual can apply 3 years after becoming a permanent resident.

 

 

Note: an individual who obtained permanent residency through employment or other means can still benefit from earlier eligibility if he/she is married to a US citizen, as long as he/she has been married to and living with a US citizen for 3 years at the time of filing (the US citizen spouse must also have been a US citizen during the requisite 3 year period).

 

Other general requirements include the following:
•    Be at least 18 years old at the time of filing
•    Show that you have lived for at least 3 months in the state or USCIS district where you apply.
•    Demonstrate continuous residence in the United States for at least 5 years (or 3 years if married to a US citizen

      immediately preceding the date of filing. Note that a trip abroad that lasts for 6 months or longer can break the

      continuous residence requirement.   
•    Show that you have been physically present in the United States for at least 30 months out of the 5 years immediately

      preceding the date of filing (pro-rated for spouses of US citizens).
•    Be able to read, write, and speak basic English.
•    Have a basic understanding of U.S. history and government (civics).
•    Be a person of good moral character.
•    Demonstrate an attachment to the principles and ideals of the U.S. Constitution.

 

The USCIS has additional information about eligibility for naturalization at www.uscis.gov
 

The naturalization process typically involves four steps: (1) filing Form N-400, (2) biometrics; (3) an interview at a USCIS Field Office that includes a civics and English test, and (4) an Oath Ceremony.

Note that the United States permits dual citizenship, but not all countries do. 
See: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal-considerations/us-citizenship-laws-policies/citizenship-and-dual-nationality/dual-nationality.html