Naturalization

A permanent resident is eligible for US citizenship 5 years after becoming a permanent resident, unless the individual is married to a US citizen, in which case the individual can apply 3 years after becoming a permanent resident.

 

 

Note: an individual who obtained permanent residency through employment or other means can still benefit from earlier eligibility if he/she is married to a US citizen, as long as he/she has been married to and living with a US citizen for 3 years at the time of filing (the US citizen spouse must also have been a US citizen during the requisite 3 year period).

 

Other general requirements include the following:
•    Be at least 18 years old at the time of filing
•    Show that you have lived for at least 3 months in the state or USCIS district where you apply.
•    Demonstrate continuous residence in the United States for at least 5 years (or 3 years if married to a US citizen

      immediately preceding the date of filing. Note that a trip abroad that lasts for 6 months or longer can break the

      continuous residence requirement.   
•    Show that you have been physically present in the United States for at least 30 months out of the 5 years immediately

      preceding the date of filing (pro-rated for spouses of US citizens).
•    Be able to read, write, and speak basic English.
•    Have a basic understanding of U.S. history and government (civics).
•    Be a person of good moral character.
•    Demonstrate an attachment to the principles and ideals of the U.S. Constitution.

 

The USCIS has additional information about eligibility for naturalization at www.uscis.gov
 

The naturalization process typically involves four steps: (1) filing Form N-400, (2) biometrics; (3) an interview at a USCIS Field Office that includes a civics and English test, and (4) an Oath Ceremony.

Note that the United States permits dual citizenship, but not all countries do. 
See: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal-considerations/us-citizenship-laws-policies/citizenship-and-dual-nationality/dual-nationality.html